MSPA Fall Conference 2017: Advanced Interpretation of the WISC-5 and WIAT-3/ LD Identification, Legally Defensible Reports & Expert Testimony for the Savvy School Psychologist

  • 27 Oct 2017
  • 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM
  • Four Points Sheraton Norwood: 1125 Boston Providence Turnpike, Norwood, MA 02062

Registration


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Session 1: Advanced Interpretation of the WISC-5 and WIAT-3/ LD Identification 

This presentation will focus on more advanced interpretation of the subtests and scores which can be obtained from the new WISC-5. Special focus will be given to how the scores can be combined with achievement scores from the WIAT-3, and other measures, to look at patterns of strengths and weaknesses which may be useful and helping clinicians make decisions about learning disability (LD) identification and other clinical decisions. The presentation will also include a brief review of the mechanics of how the scores can be compared within the Q-global scoring system.

To help set an appropriate context for discussing the scores from these tests and making clinical decisions, the presentation will include a brief review of research leading to the development of RTI models and current LD theories. Case examples will be presented to help provide a specific context for this discussion. This is intended to be an interactive presentation with psychologists who attend so that this can be as useful a discussion as possible for attendees.

 OBJECTIVES 

  • Attendees will have a better understanding of the history of, and recent research-based models for, LD identification and their basic differences.
  •  Attendees will be able to articulate the main concepts in using processing strengths and weaknesses (PSW) models for LD identification, especially with regard to reading disabilities.
  • Attendees will gain a better understanding of using Q-global to analyze test data from the WISC-5, WIAT-3, and KTEA 3.
  • Review legal & ethical mandates that guide assessment and report writing and learn how to provide evidence of these mandates within a psycho-educational report.
  • Identify components of a well-written psycho-educational report, and how to satisfy various consumers within one report.
  • Learn what to say, how to say it, and what not to say in a psycho-educational report.
  • Understand how to conduct comprehensive assessments and write reports that may help prevent disputes that lead to due process hearings.
  • Apply strategies for conducting expert testimony as a School Psychologist.

Presenter Bio 

Dr. Michael Grau is the Pearson Clinical Assessment Consultant for MA, CT, and Eastern NY/NYC/LI. Prior to joining the Pearson staff in January 2009, he served as Director of Clinical and Consultation Services at Wildwood Programs in Albany, NY where he and his staff consulted with schools across New York State to provide independent neuropsychological evaluations, functional behavioral assessments, and staff training on various clinical issues. He is a member of the National Academy of Neuropsychology. Dr. Grau also has extensive school based experience as a school psychologist and special education coordinator. He has taught at the undergraduate and graduate levels. He also served as Vice-President of the Council of New York Special Education Administrators.

Session 2: Legally Defensible Reports & Expert Testimony for the Savvy School Psychologist

Description of Presentation:

School Psychologists must write psycho-educational reports for a broad audience: parents, teachers, principals, advocates, attorneys, and even hearing officers. There are a number of strategies we can include to make sure we complete competent assessments and write reports that satisfy all stakeholders, while “holding up” in a due process hearing. This presentation will help School Psychologists learn how to write legally defensible reports while maintaining a creative and consumer-friendly approach. Strategies for expert testimony will be shared, should a dispute end up in a due process hearing.

Objectives:

  • Review legal & ethical mandates that guide assessment and report writing and learn how to provide evidence of these mandates within a psycho-educational report.
  • Identify components of a well-written psycho-educational report, and how to satisfy various consumers within one report.
  • Learn what to say, how to say it, and what not to say in a psycho-educational report.
  • Understand how to conduct comprehensive assessments and write reports that may help prevent disputes that lead to due process hearings.
  • Apply strategies for conducting expert testimony as a School Psychologist.

Brief Biographical Sketch: Tracy Paskiewicz is a School Psychology faculty member at UMass-Boston, teaching courses related to cognitive and academic assessment, supervision, and multicultural competence. She worked as a School Psychologist in a large, urban district for more than ten years. Her professional interests include issues of bias and fairness in assessment, culturally competent assessment practices, differential diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders, and supervision, training, and professional development of school psychologists. 

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